Prescribed burns are planned for the Bridger-Teton National Forest:  Hams Fork Rx, East Zone Piles, West Zone Piles

Western WY- The Bridger-Teton National Forest and Grand Teton National Park are cancelling fire restrictions as of noon on Friday, October 5. Due to widespread precipitation received and anticipated, cooler temperatures, and shorter days across the region, fire managers have determined the fire-danger rating will decrease from very high to moderate by Friday.

Teton Interagency fire managers in cooperation with the Wyoming Game and Fish, Jackson Hole Fire and EMS and the Teton Area Wildfire Protection Coalition are planning to implement the Beaver Mountain Prescribed Burn sometime this fall, as weather and resources allow, on the Jackson Ranger District of the Bridger- Teton National Forest.  The Beaver Mountain prescribed burn is located approximately 20-miles south of Jackson, Wy in the Bryan Flats area.Prescribed fire is an important tool in reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfire across the landscape and can help prevent extreme fires by reducing hazardous fuel buildup.  Managed prescribed fires provide crucial benefits to natural resources. 

As soon as When weather conditions and available fire personnel are favorable for implementation, crews will begin the firing operations for the project. At this time the desired dayIt is anticipated that for ignitions may beginbe Wednesday September, 19th. For each prescribed fire, fire managers work with other resource managers for several years planning and writing a specific prescription that includes parameters for wind speed and direction, smoke dispersal, relative humidity, fuel moisture for live and dead burnable vegetation, and more. The prescribe fire plans also delineates types and numbers of resources needed to safely conduct each burn and to support contingency plans. 

The Beaver Mountain prescribed burn is located approximately 20-miles south of Jackson, Wy in the Bryan Flats area. Crews will apply fire to the 700 acre unit using a combination of hand torches and helicopter ignition devices to break up the continuity of vegetative fuels.  "The ignition phase for the project is expected to take three to five days depending on the weather and fuels conditions," said Mary Moore, Jackson District Ranger. Smoke may impact the area as the cool night and morning air often cause the smoke to sink in the canyon area and create an inversion.  Motorists are reminded to travel with caution, just as going through any low visibility area.  Access to the trail along the western and southern boundaries of the burn unit, will be inaccessible during operations and trail users should plan accordingly. Hazards will exist within the vicinity of the burn area even after firing operations are completed and the public is urged to watch for snags and falling trees, rolling rocks and debris, and residual smoke and flames if entering into the burn area immediately after firing operations.  Fire and smoke will be visible until the burn units receives wetting precipitation.

 Firefighters will stay on site over the evening hours and camp on the forest until the firing operations are complete.  Afterwards, the Beaver Mountain unit will be patrolled daily for any hazards and monitored for areas of concern until the prescribed fire is called out.  An information station will be available in the Bryan Flats area for education and information on fire management on public lands and within the Wildland Urban Interface. The primary objective for the burn is to increase defensible space south of the Hoback Junction area, as identified in the Teton Area Wildfire Protection Plan.

 For more information please call 307-739-5424 or visit the information station during firing operations.

Prescribed fire is an important tool in reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfire across the landscape and can help prevent extreme fires by reducing hazardous fuel buildup. Managed prescribed fires provides benefits to natural resources.

 

 

Wildland and Prescribed Fire Map